In an attempt to make conversations in public publications more meaningful, Facebook has launched an update in which it will rank comments to promote those that are most relevant to users.

Facebook will now begin to show comments in public posts more prominently when comments have interactions on the page or the person who originally posted or friends of the person who posted.

“We will continue to take other signals into account, so we do not prominently show low quality comments, even if they are from the person who made the original publication or from their friends,” said Justine Shen, Facebook Product Manager, release. on Friday.

Users can moderate comments in their publication by hiding, deleting or participating with comments.

Ranking is enabled by default for pages and people with many followers, but pages and people with many followers can choose to turn off rating comments.

The changes will apply to comments in Pages public posts and people with many followers, but anyone can choose to comment on the rating classification function through their settings. Facebook will base the ratings on the way people interact with the comments, whether they like it, react or respond. Users can still moderate comments on their own publications by hiding, deleting or responding as they wish. Facebook will also look for “signs of integrity” and, if the comments violate its standards, the company will eliminate them.

Facebook is not the only platform that seeks to improve conversations. Twitter has led the way with a handful of new features. And Facebook is not only worried about the comments. Last month he introduced a system to classify the videos and prioritize the original content. This is another attempt to improve the quality of the content on the platform, and probably not the last one.

People who do not have as many followers will not have the rating of comments activated automatically, since there are fewer comments in general, but anyone can decide to enable comment classification when accessing their settings.

“We want people to see safe and authentic comments. If a comment violates our community’s standards, we eliminate it.

“We also take into account other signals, such as compromise bait, to address the integrity of the information and improve the quality of the comments that people see,” Facebook said.

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